Dual Credit & Concurrent Courses

Paris Junior College Course Catalog

Miller Grove ISD pays for class fees as well as class books for all dual credit classes.  The following courses are offered for DUAL CREDIT:

English 1301 – Composition I

Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis. Placement by department (based on admission information).

English 1302 – Composition II

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods: critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301.

English 2322 – British Literature I

A survey of the development of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the Eighteenth Century. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical linguistic, and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301.

English 2323 – British Literature II

A survey of the development of British literature from the Romantic period to the present. Students will study work of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301.

HIST 1301 – United States History I      

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War/Reconstruction period. United States History I includes the study of pre-Columbian, colonial, revolutionary, early national, slavery and sectionalism, and the Civil War/Reconstruction eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History I include: American settlement and diversity, American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, and creation of the federal government.

HIST 1302 – United States History II 

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the Civil War/Reconstruction era to the present. United States History II examines industrialization, immigration, world wars, the Great Depression, Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History II include: American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of the federal government, and the study of U.S. foreign policy.

MATH 1314 – College Algebra 

In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics may be included. Pre- requisite: MATH 0401 or two years high school algebra and appropriate placement test.

MATH 2312 – Pre-Calculus Math 

In-depth combined study of algebra, trigonometry, and other topics for calculus readiness. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 with a “C” or better or by placement test.

Miller Grove ISD allows students to take college courses while at school.  These courses are taken online with students being allowed to have time during the normal academic day to work on these courses.  Students receive both high school and college credit for these courses.  The following courses are offered CONCURRENTLY:

BIOL 2301  – Anatomy & Physiology I (High School A&P)

Anatomy and Physiology I is the first part of a two course sequence. It is a study of the structure and function of the human body including cells, tissues and organs of the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and special senses. Emphasis is on interrelationships among systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis. Fee charged. Co-requisite lab BIOL 2101.

BIOL 2101      Anatomy & Physiology I (lab)

The lab provides a hands-on learning experience for exploration of human system components and basic physiology. Systems to be studied include integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and special senses. Co-requisite for BIOL 2301.

BIOL 2302  – Anatomy and Physiology II (High School A&P)

Anatomy and Physiology II is the second part of a two-course sequence. It is a study of the structure and function of the human body including the following systems: endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive (including nutrition), urinary (including fluid and electrolyte balance), and reproductive (including human development and genetics). Emphasis is on interrelationships among systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis. Fee charged. Prerequisite: BIOL 2301 or consent of instructor. Co-requisite lab BIOL 2102.

BIOL 2102 – Anatomy & Physiology II (lab)

The lab provides a hands-on learning experience for exploration of  human system components and basic physiology. Systems to be studied include endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive (including nutrition), urinary (including fluid and electrolyte balance), and reproductive (including human development and genetics).  Co-requisite for BIOL 2302.

GOVT 2305 – Federal Government (High School Government)

Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights. Note: It is recommended that students take both semesters of government at the same institution.

ECON 2301 – Principles of Macroeconomics (High School Economics)

An introduction to the U.S. economy’s organization and operation. Emphasis is placed on national income determination, monetary and fiscal policies, money and banking, business cycles, and economic growth.

MATH 2413  – Calculus I (High School Calculus)

Limits and continuity; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; definition of the derivative of a function and techniques of differentiation; applications of the derivative to maximizing or minimizing a function; the chain rule, mean value theorem, and rate of change problems; curve sketching; definite and in- definite integration of algebraic, trigonometric, and transcendental functions, with an application to calculation of areas. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 and 1316 or 2312; or two years of high school algebra and high school trigonometry or pre-calculus.

MATH 2414 – Calculus II (High School Calculus)

Differentiation and integration of transcendental functions; parametric equations and polar coordinates; techniques of integration; sequences and series; improper integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 2413.

SPAN 1411 – Beginning Spanish I (High School Spanish 3)

Basic Spanish language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing within a cultural framework. Students will acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to communicate and comprehend at the beginner level.

SPAN 1412 – Beginning Spanish II (High School Spanish 3)

Continued development of basic Spanish language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing within a cultural framework. Students acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to communicate and comprehend at the high beginner to low intermediate level.

SPAN 2311 – Intermediate Spanish I (High School Spanish 4)

The consolidation of skills acquired at the introductory level. Further development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis on comprehension, appreciation, and interpretation of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Fee charged. Prerequisites: two years of high school Spanish or SPAN 1412.

SPAN 2312 – Intermediate Spanish II (High School Spanish 4)

The consolidation of skills acquired at the introductory level. Further development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis on comprehension, appreciation, and interpretation of the cultures of the Span- ish-speaking world. Prerequisites: SPAN 2311 or consent of instructor.

SPCH 1315 – Public Speaking (High School Speech)

Application of communication theory and practice to the public speaking con- text, with emphasis on audience analysis, speaker delivery, ethics of communication, cultural diversity, and speech organizational techniques to develop students’ speaking abilities, as well as ability to effectively evaluate oral presentations.